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Excellence in all we do: 58th MXG wins the AETC 2019 Maintenance Effectiveness Award

An Airman performs a pre-flight inspection.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Ray R. Walden, 58th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, performs a pre-flight inspection at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June 4, 2020. The 58th Maintenance Group provides launch, recovery, inspection and sustainment of Special Operations and Personnel Recovery aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

An Airman inspects an aircraft.

Airmen from the 58th Maintenance Squadron inspect a CV-22 Osprey to ensure mission readiness on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June 4, 2020. The 58th MXS is responsible for maintaining their aircraft and ensuring they are mission ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

An Airman works on an aircraft.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Tariq A. Sherif, 58th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, works on a CV-22 Osprey at Kirtland Force Base, New Mexico, June 3, 2020. The 58th Maintenance Group won the AETC 2019 Maintenance Effectiveness Award. This award is given to units that prove successful at providing safe, serviceable and available equipment for sustained use in peacetime and wartime. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

An Airmen works on an aircraft.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jake J. Davello, 58th Maintenance Squadron crew chief, provides maintenance to a CV-22 Osprey propeller on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June 4, 2020. The 58th MXS is responsible for maintaining their aircraft and ensuring they are mission ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

An Airman works on an aircraft.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jake J. Davello, 58th Maintenance Squadron crew chief, provides maintenance to a CV-22 Osprey propeller on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June 4, 2020. The 58th Maintenance Group won the AETC 2019 Maintenance Effectiveness Award, marking the first time the group has ever won this award.(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

An Airman inspects an aircraft.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Donovan M. Harper, 58th Maintenance Squadron CV-22 aircraft inspection journeyman, works on a CV-22 Osprey at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June 3, 2020. The 58th Maintenance Group won the AETC 2019 Maintenance Effectiveness Award, marking the first time the group has ever won this award. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

Airmen inspect an aircraft.

Airmen from the 58th Maintenance Squadron test the propellers on a CV-22 Osprey on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June 4, 2020. The 58th Maintenance Group provides launch, recovery, inspection and sustainment of Special Operations and Personnel Recovery aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

Airmen inspect aircraft components.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Tyler K. Guieb, left, 58th Maintenance Squadron armament flight member, and U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Kevin J. Norris Jr., 58th Maintenance Squadron armament flight member, inspect components of a machine gun on an HH-60G Pave Hawk at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June 4, 2020. The 58th MXS is responsible for maintaining their aircraft and ensuring they are mission ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

An Airman operates a lift.

An Airman operates a lift while providing maintenance work to a CV-22 Osprey at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June 3, 2020. The mission of the 58th Maintenance Group is to provide specialized Air Power, Air Warriors and Innovative Solutions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

An Airman stands on an aircraft.
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyler W. Wright, 58th Maintenance Squadron CV-22 aircraft inspection apprentice, observes operations while standing on a CV-22 Osprey at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, June 3, 2020. The 58th Maintenance Group won the AETC 2019 Maintenance Effectiveness Award. This award is given to units that prove successful at providing safe, serviceable and available equipment for sustained use in peacetime and wartime. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers)

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM. --

The 58th Maintenance Group (MXG) recently won the Air Education and Training Command 2019 Maintenance Effectiveness Award, marking the first time they’ve ever won this award. 

The MEA is an annual award recognizing the unit that has been deemed most successful at providing safe, serviceable and available equipment for sustained use in peacetime and wartime. 

The 58th MXG mission is to provide specialized Air Power, Air Warriors and Innovative Solutions. These core values were vital in their success. 

“This award acknowledges the collective efforts of individual teams within the MXG who are working on several disparate game-changing initiatives,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Justin R. Hoffman, 58th Special Operations Wing commander. “It brings together recognition for the excellence that is spread across our formation of Airmen.  It’s not just about one aspect or one person—this award celebrates the collective effort of our entire team.” 

Winning the MEA shines light on the hard work and dedication Airmen and leadership have put into keeping the mission going throughout the last year. 

“Our performance in 2019 was unprecedented,” said U.S. Air Force Capt. Seth M. Rodgers, 58th MXG aircraft maintenance officer. “We executed more flying hours this year than we have in the last 13 years.” 

Maintainers are the most valuable asset the MXG has, said Rodgers, and only through their hard work and relentless dedication was the MXG able to succeed in its mission.

“As a team, we execute the launch, recovery, inspection and sustainment of Special Operations and Personnel Recovery aircraft in support of the Headquarters USAF/AETC formal school for combat training,” said U.S. Air Force Col. John E. Baquet, 58th MXG commander. “Our group performs flightline and back-shop maintenance at both the organizational and intermediate level for 36 aircraft across five unique mission design series.” 

Baquet also noted they maintain the Department of Defense’s only centralized jet engine intermediate maintenance facility, which is responsible for overhauling more than 500 T400 and T700 helicopter engines. 

“It’s all about the culture of pride, professionalism and determination we’ve built for ourselves,” said Baquet. “Victory on the battlefield begins with us.”