HomeNews

News Search

Collecting and storing JASSMs, another MUNS mission

Collecting and storing JASSMs, another MUNS mission

An explosive warning sign sits on the outside of an unloading machine at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 5, 2020. Some of the cargo that was being unloaded were Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missiles (JASSM). (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stuart Bright)

Collecting and storing JASSMs, another MUNS mission

Airmen of the 2nd Munitions Squadron prepare to move Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missiles (JASSM) via forklift at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 5, 2020. The missiles arrived by C-5 Galaxy to be transported to a storage facility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stuart Bright)

Collecting and storing JASSMs, another MUNS mission

Senior Airman Kayla Satcher, 2nd Munitions Squadron crew chief, inspects and locks down a Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM) to a truck at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 5, 2020. The missiles were loaded into a storage facility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stuart Bright)

Collecting and storing JASSMs, another MUNS mission

Airmen of the 2nd Bomb Wing prepare to unload Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missiles (JASSM) from a C-5 Galaxy at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 5, 2020. The missiles were originally sent down range in response to tensions escalating with Iran back in January 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stuart Bright)

Collecting and storing JASSMs, another MUNS mission

A 2nd Munitions Squadron Airmen locks down a Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM) to a truck at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 5, 2020. These missiles were loaded into a storage facility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stuart Bright)

Collecting and storing JASSMs, another MUNS mission

Airmen of the 2nd Munitions Squadron Munitions Storage Section have a safety brief at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 5, 2020. They were preparing to unload Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missiles (JASSM) from a C-5 Galaxy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stuart Bright)

Collecting and storing JASSMs, another MUNS mission

Airmen of the 2nd Munitions Squadron store Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missiles (JASSM) at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 5, 2020. The missiles were originally sent down range in response to tensions escalating with Iran back in January 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stuart Bright)

Collecting and storing JASSMs, another MUNS mission

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Marth, 2nd Munitions Squadron munitions controller, drives towards the flightline at Barksdale Air Force Base, La., May 5, 2020. Marth and his team were on site to retrieve Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missiles (JASSM) returning from downrange. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Stuart Bright)

BARKSDALE AIR FORCE BASE, La. --

In January of 2020, missile attacks from Iran to U.S. installations in Iraq brought tensions between the two countries to a point that was feared to trigger a full scale war.

In response to this, AGM-158 Joint Air to Surface Standoff Missiles (JASSM) from Barksdale Air Force Base, La., were sent down range to be used if needed to counter any future threats.

“JASSM missiles are an effective weapon that give our pilots the option to strike long range targets that our other bombs can't reach,” said Staff Sgt. Nicholas Marth, 2nd Munitions Squadron munitions controller.

It was the duty of the 2nd MUNS Airmen to send these munitions downrange and subsequently to make sure the weapons were retrieved and placed back into storage. Last week, those JASSMs were flown into Barksdale by a C-5 Galaxy. The Airmen spent much of the afternoon and morning collecting the munitions, making sure they were delivered intact and properly stored.

“Our job is to provide pilots and aircraft with munitions to carry out their missions,” Marth said. “When those munitions are not being used or on standby we keep them stored and secured.”

Air superiority is a key factor in keeping the Air Force the best in the world. These Airmen ensure that the jets are supplied with the right munitions for the mission at hand.

“If 2nd MUNS was to disappear from the bomb dump then the mission at Barksdale would not be fulfilled because of the amount of support we have on the base as a whole,” said Airman 1st Class Ivan Vargas, 2nd MUNS storage stockpile technician. “Having no munitions at Barksdale or at any base would make the base incredibly vulnerable no matter how much manpower is provided by other units.”

Shipping and storing missiles and bombs is a unique job that is important to the mission of not only the 2nd Bomb Wing, but to the Air Force.

“I like my job because it provides me with a multitude of opportunities that I previously did not have back in my home town and previous careers,” Vargas said. “The team dynamic in my squadron is not like any previously experienced in my life. The areas all across 2nd MUNS have a hand to hand brotherhood that will support one another in completing a specified task assigned.”

The Airmen of the 2nd MUNS will make sure that the weapons needed to defend this country are not only safe and secure, but are ready at a moment's notice to be loaded up.

“2nd MUNS is the backbone of Barksdale Air Force Base,” Vargas said. “Having us in the mission is essential in getting things done to help the 2nd Bomb Wing”