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Historic month of May for 71st AMU; all maintenance metrics met

Maintainers work on CV-22 Osprey propeller blades.

Airmen with the 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit replace CV-22 Osprey propeller blades at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, July 10, 2020. For the first time since December 2016, the 71st AMU met all 12 maintenance metrics during the month of May 2020, producing 143.8 flying hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Austin J. Prisbrey)

Maintainer works on a CV-22 propeller blade.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Colton Nay, 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit CV-22 Osprey crew chief, replaces CV-22 Osprey propeller blades at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, July 10, 2020. For the first time since December 2016, the 71st AMU met all 12 maintenance metrics during the month of May 2020, producing 143.8 flying hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Austin J. Prisbrey)

Maintainer works on a CV-22

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman William Raybern, 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit CV-22 Osprey crew chief, works on an Osprey at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, July 10, 2020. For the first time since December 2016, the 71st AMU met all 12 maintenance metrics during the month of May 2020, producing 143.8 flying hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Austin J. Prisbrey)

Maintainer works on a CV-22 Osprey.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman William Raybern, 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit CV-22 Osprey crew chief, works on internal components of an Osprey at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, July 10, 2020. For the first time since December 2016, the 71st AMU met all 12 maintenance metrics during the month of May 2020, producing 143.8 flying hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Austin J. Prisbrey)

Maintainers do pre-flight checks on CV-22 Osprey.

Airmen assigned to the 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit conduct pre-flight checks on a CV-22 Osprey at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, July 7, 2020. For the first time since December 2016, the 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit met all 12 maintenance metrics during the month of May 2020, producing 143.8 flying hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Austin J. Prisbrey)

Two CV-22 Osprey awaits takeoff.

Two CV-22 Ospreys prepare for takeoff at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, July 7, 2020. For the first time since December 2016, the 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit met all 12 maintenance metrics during the month of May 2020, producing 143.8 flying hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Austin J. Prisbrey)

Maintainer awaits takeoff.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Desmon McQuillan, 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit CV-22 Osprey crew chief, waits for takeoff at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, July 7, 2020. For the first time since December 2016, the 71st AMU met all 12 maintenance metrics during the month of May 2020, producing 143.8 flying hours. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Austin J. Prisbrey)

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. --

For the first time since December 2016, the 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit met all 12 maintenance metrics during the month of May 2020, producing 143.8 flying hours.

The mission of the 71st AMU is to provide mission ready CV-22 Ospreys for the 71st Special Operations Squadron. The 71st SOS trains pilots and special mission aviators on the Osprey, providing qualified aircrew to multiple major commands.

“Flying hours is the ultimate goal,” said Demarcus Crawford, 71st AMU production superintendent. "Ultimately our [operations] customers need ‘X’ amount of time on the flight deck and in the air with their students in order to progress them through their training syllabi.”

Due to COVID-19, Airmen from the 71st AMU continue to work through challenges such as reduced manning.

“I would say that, unlike previous months that the [71st] AMU would have come close to or meeting all 12 metrics, it is significant that we have done it while incorporating modified work practices and schedules due to the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Senior Master Sgt. Antonio Trigo, 71st AMU lead production superintendent.

Hard work and a culture of pride and innovation brought about a great month for the 71st AMU and their flying customers at the 71st SOS.

“We strive every day to provide safe and reliable aircraft, on time, to our aircrew, ultimately producing the world's finest [special operation forces] aircrew warriors,” said Trigo. “The sense of pride I see in the maintainers who work the CV-22 Osprey is unmatched.”