See something, say something

The Eagle Eyes program is an Air Force anti-terrorism initiative that enlists the eyes and ears of Air Force members and citizens in the war on terror. Eagle eyes teaches people about the typical activities terrorists engage in to plan their attacks. Armed with this information, anyone can recognize elements of potential terror planning when they see it. The program provides a network of local, 24-hour phone numbers to call whenever a suspicious activity is observed. (U.S. Air Force graphic)

The Eagle Eyes program is an Air Force anti-terrorism initiative that enlists the eyes and ears of Air Force members and citizens in the war on terror. Eagle eyes teaches people about the typical activities terrorists engage in to plan their attacks. Armed with this information, anyone can recognize elements of potential terror planning when they see it. The program provides a network of local, 24-hour phone numbers to call whenever a suspicious activity is observed. (U.S. Air Force graphic)

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. --

“Watch, report, protect.” That is the motto of the U.S. Air Force Eagle Eyes program.

The Eagle Eyes program is an Air Force antiterrorism initiative that enlists the eyes and ears of Air Force members and citizens to keep installations Air Force-wide safe.

“Every Airmen is a sensor,” said William Bravo, 377th Security Forces Group antiterrorism officer, physical security specialist and installation AT program manager. “Kirtland’s security is everyone’s responsibility – uniformed service members, civilians and contractors. This base is our home.”

Eagle Eyes lists seven types of suspicious behavior that should be looked out for and gives information about how to report it. 

Surveillance 
Someone recording or monitoring activities. This may include the use of cameras (either still or video), note taking, drawing diagrams, annotating on maps, or using binoculars or other vision-enhancing devices. 

Elicitation 
People or organizations attempting to gain information about military operations, capabilities, or people. Examples could include being approached at a gas station (or mall, airport or library, etc.) and asked about what's happening at the base.

Tests of security 
Any attempts to measure reaction times to security breaches or to penetrate physical security barriers or procedures in order to assess strengths and weaknesses. Examples: a driver approaches the front gate (without identification) and pretends to be lost or to have taken a wrong term, just to learn the procedures of how he is dealt with and how far into the gate he can get before being turned around. 

Acquiring supplies 
Purchasing or stealing explosives, weapons, ammunition, etc. Also includes acquiring military uniforms, decals, flight manuals, passes or badges (or the equipment to manufacture such items) or any other controlled items 

Suspicious persons out of place 
People who don't seem to belong in the workplace, neighborhood, business establishment, or anywhere else. Includes suspicious border crossings and stowaways aboard ship or people jumping ship in port.

Dry run 
People being moved into position and moving them around according to their plan without actually committing the terrorist act. Take note of people moving around from place to place without any apparent purpose and doing it, perhaps, many times. 

Deploying assets: people and supplies getting into position to commit the act. 
This is a person's last chance to alert authorities before the terrorist act occurs. Look for people loading up vehicles with weaponry/ explosives, etc., and/or parking that vehicle somewhere, or people in military uniforms (who don't look right) approaching an installation or getting into a vehicle, or people who seem out of place standing by at a certain location as if waiting for something to happen. 

Bravo says to use a “SALUTE report” if you do see anything.

S – Size. Report the number of personnel, vehicles, aircraft, or size of an object.

A – Activity. Report detailed account of actions, such as direction of personnel movement.

L – Location. Report where you saw the activity. Include grid coordinates or reference from a known point including the distance and direction from the known point.

U – Unit. Report any distinctive features, such as uniforms, patches or colored tabs, headgear, vehicle identification markings, etc.

T – Time. Report the time the activity was observed, not the time you report it.

E – Equipment.  Report all equipment associated with the activity, such as weapons, vehicles, tools.  If unable to identify the equipment, provide as much detail as you can.

“Protecting Team Kirtland, our families and our visitors falls squarely on our wing, and on my shoulders as installation commander. It is something that I will never overlook when it comes to exercising due diligence,” said Col. Richard Gibbs, 377th Air Base Wing commander. “Our units have authority and responsibilities across five different major commands, multiple combatant commands and the Departments of Energy. Their responsibilities to our nation are immense. At the same time, our responsibilities at the 377th to enable those missions and to carry out our own are equally imperative. Force protection is first among these responsibilities.” 

If you see, hear or receive anything suspicious, contact Base Defense Operations Center at 505-846-7913 or 505-846-7926 and Air Force OSI at 505-846-0999.