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Kirtland hosts groundwater treatment open house

Scott Clark, U.S. Air Force Civil Engineer Center, explains how water is cleaned at the groundwater treatment system facility at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., July 25, 2019. Kirtland AFB hosted an open house to give the public the opportunity to learn and ask questions about the work being done to remove groundwater contamination. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Eli Chevalier)

Scott Clark, U.S. Air Force Civil Engineer Center, explains how water is cleaned at the groundwater treatment system facility at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., July 25, 2019. Kirtland AFB hosted an open house to give the public the opportunity to learn and ask questions about the work being done to remove groundwater contamination. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Eli Chevalier)

Ben Moayyad, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project manager, explains the results of the bulk fuels contamination leak cleanup project to attendees of an open house at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., July 25, 2019. The open house gave the public a chance to see the treatment facility, learn about and ask questions about the cleanup process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Eli Chevalier)

Ben Moayyad, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project manager, explains the results of the bulk fuels contamination leak cleanup project to attendees of an open house at Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M., July 25, 2019. The open house gave the public a chance to see the treatment facility, learn about and ask questions about the cleanup process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Eli Chevalier)

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. --

Kirtland Air Force Base hosted an open house for the public at its groundwater treatment facility here, July 25, 2019.

"We want our neighbors to be able to get behind the fence and see for themselves what the Air Force is doing to clean up the contamination from the bulk fuels facility link and protect their drinking water," said Kathryn Lynnes, Bulk Fuels Facility Project senior advisor. "The public [were] also able to speak directly with our technical experts in a less formal setting than our typical public meetings."

Demonstrations and booths were set up at the event to show how the contamination is being removed, and experts from government agencies were there to field questions from the public.

"It looks like a very solid project," said Reinhard Lorenz, an attendee of the event. "It looks like a very solid treatment plant. Progress has been made and there is still more to come."

More information on the project and cleanup is available at the Kirtland AFB website and here.

"The community's drinking water is safe and the Air Force is committed to keeping it safe while we work with the New Mexico Environment Department to complete the investigation and perform the cleanup," said Lyness.