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377TH AIR BASE WING LINEAGE

Posted 11/13/2006 Printable Fact Sheet

Lineage
Established as 377th Combat Support Group, activated and organized on April 8, 1966. Re-designated 377th Air Base Wing on January 17, 1972. Inactivated on March 28, 1973. Re-designated 377th Combat Support Wing on June 1, 1985 and activated June 14, 1985. Inactivated on May 1, 1991. Re-designated and activated as 377th Air Base Wing on January 1, 1993.

Assignments
7th Air Force: April 8, 1966 - March 28, 1973. 316th Air Division: June 14, 1985 - May 1, 1991. Space and Missile Systems Center: January 1, 1993 - October 1, 1998; Air Armament Center: October 1, 1998 - May 3, 2004; HQ AFMC: May 3, 2004 - Present.

Components
Squadrons 8th Special Operations: assigned January 15, - October 1, 1972; attached October 12-25, 1972. 9th Special Operations: attached January 12, 1972 - February 29, 1972. 21st Tactical Air Support: March 15, 1972 - February 23, 1973 (not operational February 21-23, 1973). 310th Tactical Airlift: January 15, - November 15, 1972 (not operational November 1-15, 1972). 360th Tactical Electronic Warfare: February 1, - November 24, 1972 (not operational November 15-24, 1972). 377th Air Police (re-designated 377th Security Police Squadron on May 18, 1967): April 8, 1966 - March 28, 1973. 377th Armament and Electronics Maintenance: April 8, 1966-November 25, 1966. 377th Civil Engineering: April 8, 1966 - August 2, 1972. 377th Comptroller: January 1, 1993 - October 1, 1994; June 1, 1995 - Present. 377th Field (later, 377th Consolidated Aircraft; 377th Field) Maintenance: April 8, 1966 - November 25, 1966; August 17, 1971 - October 1, 1972; October 1, 1972 - March 28, 1973. Field Maintenance Squadron Provisional-377th: attached August 28 - October 1, 1972. 377th Munitions Maintenance: April 8, 1966 - November 31, 1966. 377th Organizational Maintenance: April 8, 1966 - September 25, 1966. Organizational Maintenance Provisional-377th: attached August 28 - October 1, 1972. 377th Services: April 8, 1966 - March 28, 1973; June 14, 1985 - May 1, 1991. 377th Supply: April 8, 1966 - March 28, 1973. 377th Transportation, April 8, 1966 - March 28, 1973, January 1, 1993 - October 1, 2002; re-designated 377th Logistics Readiness Squadron: October 1, 2002 - Present. 377th Dispensary (later, 377th USAF Hospital): April 8, 1966 - March 28, 1973; 6251st USAF Clinic: September 15, 1972 - February 1, 1973. 6252d Operations: June 10, 1966 - January 1, 1967. 6255th Air Base: May 12, - July 1, 1972. 7068th Air Base: June 14, 1985 - Unk. 7240th Air Base: June 14, 1985 - Unk. 377th Contracting: June 19, 2000 - Present. Groups 377th Civil Engineering: June 14, 1985 - May 1, 1991; October 1, 1995 -October 1, 2000. 377th Support: January 1972 - March 1973; June 14, 1985 - May 1, 1991; January 1, 1993 - October 1, 2002; re-designated 377th Mission Support: October 1, 2002 - Present. 377th Medical: (see lineage at 377th Medical Group site). 377th Logistics: January 1, 1993 - October 1, 2002; re-designated 377th Maintenance: October 1, 2002 - Present.

Stations
Tan Son Nhut Air Base, South Vietnam: April 8, 1966 - March 28, 1973. Ramstein Air Base, Federal Republic of Germany: June 14, 1985 - May 1, 1991. Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico: January 1, 1993 - Present.

Commanders
Colonel George Budway, April 8, 1966; Colonel Grover K. Coe, October 8, 1966; Colonel Farley E. Peebles, October 4, 1967; Colonel Benjamin B. Shields, July 26, 1968; Colonel Frank E. Marek, September 1969; Colonel Harold E. Hobbs, July 31, 1970; Colonel Charles D. Gunn Jr, July 10, 1971; Colonel David A. Odell, June 27, 1972 - March 28, 1973. Colonel Leslie A. Hobgood, June 14, 1985; Colonel Eugene A. Lupia, July 28, 1986; Colonel William D. Eckert, June 15, 1988; Colonel Adelbert W. Carpenter, January 12, 1990 - May 1, 1991. Brig Gen James L. Higham, January 1, 1993 - November 4, 1993; Colonel Felix Sanchez, November 5, 1993 - February 13, 1994; Brig Gen Charles H. Perez, February 14, 1994 - June 14, 1995; Colonel Elizabeth A. Harrell, June 14, 1995 - November 8, 1996; Colonel Gary D. Dills, November 22, 1996 - June 2, 1999; Colonel Polly A. Peyer, June 2, 1999 - September 20, 2000; Colonel Jan D. Eakle, September 22, 2000 - January 25, 2002; Colonel Kathleen D. Close, January 25, 2002 - July 10, 2003; Colonel Henry L. Andrews, Jr., July 10, 2003 - July 7, 2005; Colonel Terrence A. Feehan, July 7, 2005 - Present.

Aircraft
C/VC-47, 1966, 1972-1973; VC-54, 1966; VC-123, 1966, 1972; C/VC-118, 1972-1973; T-39, 1972-1973; A-37, 1972; C-123, 1972; C-7, 1972; EC-47, 1972; O-2A, 1972-1973.

Operations
The 377th Air Base Wing was first activated as the 377th Combat Support Group (CSG) on April 8, 1966, and assigned to Seventh Air Force, the air arm of Military Assistance Command-Vietnam (MACV). The 377 CSG replaced the 6250th Combat Support Group that same month and was responsible for operations and maintenance of the USAF portion of Tan Son Nhut Air Base, South Vietnam, from April 8, 1966 - March 28, 1973. Responsibility included housing, maintenance, base defense, and liaison with the South Vietnamese Air Force and support to numerous associate organizations including Seventh Air Force.

Tan Son Nhut AB underwent numerous enemy attacks during the group's tenure. The group was further responsible for Binh Thuy Air Base, South Vietnam, from May 12 - July 1, 1970. It supported 7th Air Force flying operations with C-47, C-54 and C-123 aircraft from June to December 1966. In 1971, the group again became responsible for supporting flight operations of T-39, C-54, C-118, and C-130 aircraft of the 834th Air Division.

Elevated to air base wing status in January 1972, it gained a tactical mission and other combat units. The wing operated the Southeast Asia Central Instructor Pilots School via the 360th Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (TEWS), using C/EC-47s, from February to November 1972. They also operated a Combat Crew Training School at Phu Cat, South Vietnam, with C-7 aircraft from March to October 1972. When the group resumed base flight operations at Tan Son Nhut in January 1972, they operated and maintained C-47, C-118 and T-39 aircraft. The 8th Special Operations Squadron (A-37) performed the strike missions from January to October 1972. The 9th Special Operations Squadron (O-2s and C-47s) conducted psychological warfare operations from January to February 1972. The 21st Tactical Air Support Squadron (Light) conducted air liaison and 0-2A Forward Air Controller (FAC) operations from March 1972 to January 1973. The 310th Tactical Airlift Squadron (C/UC-123s from January to June 1972 and C-7s from March to October 1972) performed airlift and airdrop missions from January to October 1972. The 360th Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (C/EC-47s) conducted airborne radio directional finding operations from February-November 1972, and psychological warfare operations from February to August 1972.

The 377 ABW then established an operating location of the wing headquarters at Bien Hoa Air Base, South Vietnam, on April 14, 1972, to provide turn-around service for F-4s of other organizations. It was replaced on June 20, 1972, by Detachment 1 of the wing headquarters that continued the F-4 turn-around service and added A-7 services on October 30, 1972. The detachment continued operations through February 11, 1973. The 377 ABW phased down from February to March 1973, transferring many assets to the South Vietnamese Air Force, and inactivated on March 28, 1973.

The wing was later designated and activated as the 377th Combat Support Wing (377 CSW), replacing the 86th Combat Support Group at Ramstein Air Base, Federal Republic of Germany, on June 14, 1985. The 377 CSW provided support services for Ramstein and other locations in the Kaiserslautern Military Community and other European locations from 1985 to 1991. The 377 CSW supported mobility and airlift operations during Operations DESERT SHIELD/STORM from August 1990 to April 1991. The 377 CSW inactivated on May 1, 1991.

The 377th Combat Support Wing was designated and activated as the 377th Air Base Wing (377 ABW) as host unit for Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, on January 1, 1993. The wing's mission is to "provide world-class nuclear surety, expeditionary forces and support to base operations." Commensurate with its most recent activation, the 377 ABW was assigned to Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) through its parent organization, Space and Missile Systems Center, headquartered at Los Angeles Air Force Base, California. On October 1, 1998, the 377 ABW along with the 46 TW, 96 ABW, AFDTC and DET 5, ASC, realigned under the Air Armament Center (AAC) headquartered at Eglin AFB, Florida. The 377 ABW was relieved from its assignment under AAC on May 3, 2004 and assigned as a direct reporting unit (DRU) to HQ AFMC. This reflects the position of the 377th Air Base Wing as the Air Force's premier munitions storage and maintenance unit.

Service Streamers
None.

Campaign Streamers
Vietnam Vietnam Air; Vietnam Air Offensive; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase II; Vietnam Air Offensive Phase III; Vietnam Air Offensive, Phase IV; Tet 1969/Counteroffensive; Vietnam Summer-Fall, 1969; Vietnam Winter-Spring, 1970; Santuary Counteroffensive; Southwest Monsson; Commando Hunt V; Commando Hunt VI; Commando Hunt VII; and Vietnam Ceasefire.

Air Force Expeditionary Streamers
None.

Decorations
Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards with Combat "V" Device: April 8, 1966 - May 31, 1967; January 31, - March 31, 1968; April 1, 1969 - March 31, 1971; January 17, 1972 - March 28, 1973. Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards: June 14, 1985 - June 13, 1987; May 1, 1989 - April 30, 1991. Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm: April 8, 1966 - January 28, 1973.

Emblem
Approved on July 17, 1967; slightly revised on February 28, 1995.

Description
Light Blue, a bend tri-parted Gules, Argent and Azure, between in chief a flight symbol of the last fimbriated Argent, emitting a vapor trail fess wise to sinister chief, and bend sinister wise to base passing under the tri-parted bend all Azure, and in base a plate rimmed and gridline Azure surmounted by a tiger's head affronte couped Or garnished Brown and Argent with mouth Gules; all within a diminished bordure Or. Motto: SERVING FREEDOM'S FINEST. Approved July 31, 1969.

Significance
Ultramarine blue and Air Force yellow are the Air Force's official colors. Blue alludes to the sky, the primary theater of Air Force operations. Yellow refers to the sun and excellence required of Air Force personnel. The tricolor bend suggests the colors of the flag of the United States and reflects the patriotism of the wing's personnel. The flight symbol issuing from the globe denotes the worldwide capabilities of the unit in support of combat engagements. The tiger's face symbolizes the wing's aggressive spirit and reflects its heritage and honorable service in Vietnam.


Point of Contact
377 ABW/HO, 2000 Wyoming Blvd SE Ste D-2, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5606; Commercial: 505-853-0011, DSN: 263-0011.





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